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Saturday, April 29, 2017

Turkish authorities block Wikipedia without giving reason - BBC News

Turkish authorities block Wikipedia without giving reason

Turkey has blocked all access inside the country to the online encyclopaedia Wikipedia.

Officials said "an administrative measure" had been taken, but gave no reason why.

More:Turkish authorities block Wikipedia without giving reason - BBC News

Friday, April 28, 2017

EU Says Membership Talks Still Open if Turkey Wants Them | World News | US News

EU Says Membership Talks Still Open if Turkey Wants Them

The European Union is keeping the door ajar for Turkey to become a member, but says Ankara must provide clearer signals on whether it intends to meet the entrance criteria in such areas as human rights and rule of law.

More:EU Says Membership Talks Still Open if Turkey Wants Them | World News | US News

Women Are Dying in Turkey | Foreign Affairs

Women Are Dying in Turkey And the Problem Is Getting Worse

By Sophia Jones and Nicole Tung

On a quiet November evening in 2014, Eda Okutgen left her apartment in the coastal Turkish city of Izmir and ran for her life. She didn’t get far. Her ex-husband, Ugur Buynak, had already stabbed her in the leg with a kitchen knife. And as he chased her down a flight of stairs, the successful 38-year-old businesswoman and mother screamed for help. She screamed in vain—neighbors locked their doors as Buynak fatally plunged the knife into his ex-wife. She bled out in the stairwell, her murder caught on CCTV footage that would play over and over on Turkish television.

More:Women Are Dying in Turkey | Foreign Affairs

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Nestlé and Novartis rethink role in Turkey ad campaign

Nestlé and Novartis rethink role in Turkey ad campaign

Effort to reassure on business climate hit by Erdogan clampdown

More:Nestlé and Novartis rethink role in Turkey ad campaign

Can Dündar: “Do not leave Turkey alone. Erdogan is not Turkey” | European Economic and Social Committee

Can Dündar: “Do not leave Turkey alone. Erdogan is not Turkey”

Following recent developments in Turkey, the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) invited Turkish journalist Can Dündar to its Plenary session on 26th April. The former editor-in-chief of the Turkish newspaper Cumhuriyet, currently living in exile, called on the EU to stand beside Turkey and the Turkish people in support of media freedom, human rights, rule of law and democracy. The EESC debate also assessed recent developments in Turkey and discussed EU-Turkey relations.

More:Can Dündar: “Do not leave Turkey alone. Erdogan is not Turkey” | European Economic and Social Committee

Turkey’s hotel occupancy rates rising but revenue still falling: Tourism association - TOURISM

Turkey’s hotel occupancy rates rising but revenue still falling: Tourism association

ISTANBUL

Turkey’s hotel occupancy rates rose in March after months of decline thanks to a surge in the number of business meetings and the sharp rise in the number of Iranian tourists visiting Turkey during the Nevruz holiday. However, hotel revenues have continued to decline in the first quarter of 2017, a leading sector association announced on April 27.

More:Turkey’s hotel occupancy rates rising but revenue still falling: Tourism association - TOURISM

Turkish opposition to challenge referendum at European court - The Washington Post

Turkish opposition to challenge referendum at European court

By Suzan Fraser | AP April 26 at 1:03 PM

ANKARA, Turkey — Turkey’s main opposition party said Wednesday it would challenge the outcome of the country’s April 16 referendum on expanding the president’s powers at the European Court of Human Rights a day after a high court rejected its appeal.

More:Turkish opposition to challenge referendum at European court - The Washington Post

Merkel Says EU-Turkey Ties 'Severely Hit' By Ankara Developments

Merkel Says EU-Turkey Ties 'Severely Hit' By Ankara Developments
April 27, 2017 09:45 UTC

EU-Turkey relations have been severely hit by the actions of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's government, German Chancellor Angela Merkel says.

More:Merkel Says EU-Turkey Ties 'Severely Hit' By Ankara Developments

Turkey suspends more than 9,000 police officers over 'Gulen links' - BBC News

Turkey suspends more than 9,000 police officers over 'Gulen links'

Turkey's police force has suspended more than 9,000 officers over alleged links to the US-based Islamic preacher Fethullah Gulen.

It said the action had been taken on the grounds of national security.

More:Turkey suspends more than 9,000 police officers over 'Gulen links' - BBC News

The Rise and Fall of Erdoganocracy: Why Victory May Defeat Turkey’s President

The Rise and Fall of Erdoganocracy: Why Victory May Defeat Turkey’s President
Burak Kadercan
April 26, 2017

There was a time when following Turkish politics was more like following a soap opera. It had too many recurring characters, too many subplots, and absolutely too much repetition. The plots unfolded in a relatively “slow” fashion and were not necessarily exciting or thrilling to outsiders. Consequently, Turkey had only a small and select audience base. Not anymore. Not President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s new Turkey. Turkey has gone primetime, and not necessarily in a good way.

More:The Rise and Fall of Erdoganocracy: Why Victory May Defeat Turkey’s President

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

‘We’re eating the Mercedes’ – POLITICO

‘We’re eating the Mercedes’

Once among their nation’s elite, former Turkish NATO officers are now refugees seeking political asylum in Belgium.

By David M. Herszenhorn

They were once among Turkey’s military elite — fighter pilots, tank commanders and naval officers assigned to prestigious posts abroad at NATO in Brussels and Mons.

More:‘We’re eating the Mercedes’ – POLITICO

The endgame with Turkey

The endgame with Turkey
by: Arthur Beesley

Problems are piling up for president Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey, who faces a cascade of criticism over the country’s slide into authoritarianism after a narrow referendum win that granted him sweeping new powers.

More:The endgame with Turkey

Turkey's Erdogan Plays Dictator in Constitutional Fight: Divides Nation as Popularity Wanes

Turkey's Erdogan Plays Dictator in Constitutional Fight: Divides Nation as Popularity Wanes

Doug Bandow

Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan secured near dictatorial powers in the recent constitutional referendum. Yet all is not well for the would-be sultan. He predicted that he’d win 60 percent or more of the vote, but barely broke 51 percent after rigging the ballot, destroying a free press, and criminalizing criticism. The opposition is divided and broken, but Erdogan increasingly is feared rather than loved. His reign may be shorter than expected.

More:Turkey's Erdogan Plays Dictator in Constitutional Fight: Divides Nation as Popularity Wanes

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Turkish strike on Kurds raises US concerns

Turkish strike on Kurds raises US concerns

Isabel Coles and John Davison

Beirut: The United States has expressed "deep concern" over air strikes by Turey and says they were not authorised by the US-led coalition fighting Islamic State.

More:Turkish strike on Kurds raises US concerns

Turkey Cabinet Overhaul Coming as Erdogan Eyes Party Return - Bloomberg

Turkey Cabinet Overhaul Coming as Erdogan Eyes Party Return

Firat Kozok, Riad Hamade and Benjamin Harvey
April 25, 2017, 12:00 AM EDT

‘Fresh blood’ needed in government from time to time: premier Yildirim plans consulations with president in coming months

More:Turkey Cabinet Overhaul Coming as Erdogan Eyes Party Return - Bloomberg

Turkey Will Keep Pumping Money Into Infrastructure, Premier Says - Bloomberg

Turkey Will Keep Pumping Money Into Infrastructure, Premier Says
Firat Kozok, Riad Hamade and Benjamin Harvey
April 25, 2017, 12:00 AM EDT

Turkey will boost economic growth by finding creative ways to reduce financing costs and redirect resources to large infrastructure projects, Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said in an interview in Ankara on Monday.

More:Turkey Will Keep Pumping Money Into Infrastructure, Premier Says - Bloomberg

Editorial: Turkish president's expansino of power is perilous | Reading Eagle - NEWS

Editorial: Turkish president's expansino of power is perilous

The Issue: Turkey votes to give its president broader control over the government. Our Opinion: The result makes Recep Tayyip Erdogan a growing danger in a pivotal region.

More:Editorial: Turkish president's expansino of power is perilous | Reading Eagle - NEWS

Turkish democracy placed on damaging watchlist by EU monitors | Middle East Eye

Turkish democracy placed on damaging watchlist by EU monitors
#TurkeyPolitics

Council of Europe group votes to put Turkey on 'observation', a potentially killer blow to Ankara's already stalled EU accession process

More:Turkish democracy placed on damaging watchlist by EU monitors | Middle East Eye

Monday, April 24, 2017

"Islam is taking root in Europe"

"Islam is taking root in Europe"

Sociologist Nilufer Gole talked to Muslims throughout Europe who would otherwise never get to have their say. The results of her remarkable study have now been published in German translation. Interview by Karen Kruger

More:"Islam is taking root in Europe"

Piling on the pressure

Piling on the pressure

What exactly does integration mean? And just how much allegiance may a society demand of its migrants? Such questions are currently the topic of vigorous debate – especially following the recent referendum result in Turkey. Expecting that migrants should do all the adapting in order to conform to the majority society will, however, only stir up conflict, warns Claudia Mende

More:Piling on the pressure

Can the ‘She-Wolf’ Who Rejected the Harem Take On Sultan Erdogan?

Can the ‘She-Wolf’ Who Rejected the Harem Take On Sultan Erdogan?
[Foreign Policy Magazine]
Leela Jacinto

The feisty, nationalist grandmother Meral Aksener is a real threat to unseat Turkey’s demagogic president. If he doesn’t toss her in jail first.

Turkey’s neo-sultan managed to swing the April 16 constitutional referendum in his favor, but it’s a precarious, illegitimate win — and he knows it. The question now is how President Recep Tayyip Erdogan will handle his biggest domestic threat, a woman no less, who has refused to join his political harem, drawing support — or, at the very least, respect — from unlikely quarters.

More:Can the ‘She-Wolf’ Who Rejected the Harem Take On Sultan Erdogan?

How journalism became a crime in Turkey

How journalism became a crime in Turkey

With the April 16 referendum, Turkey took its first step into a new era. It is a step toward institutionalizing a populist model of governance that will open new ground for violations and tensions in vital areas such as justice, freedom and the supremacy of law.

More:How journalism became a crime in Turkey

Case of Turkish businessman turns political | am New York

Case of Turkish businessman turns political

By Len Levitt

Although plea bargains are usually struck in courthouse settings by prosecutors and defense attorneys, Rudy Giuliani and Michael Mukasey traveled to Turkey for this case.

More:Case of Turkish businessman turns political | am New York

How To Mismanage The Turkish Economy, By President Erdogan

How To Mismanage The Turkish Economy, By President Erdogan

Steve Hanke ,

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan came away from April 16th’s referendum with a narrow, if not questionable, win. As a result of the vote, Turkey’s constitution will be amended to allow the President of the Republic to amass considerably more power. For Erdogan, this means that, among other things, he could stay on the throne until 2029. If that weren’t enough, he will not face much in the way of checks and balances. Indeed, he will have the authority to pick judges and ministers and to appoint the heads of the military and intelligence agencies, university rectors and senior bureaucrats. Further, he gains the power to issue laws by decree with very little oversight.

More:How To Mismanage The Turkish Economy, By President Erdogan

Saturday, April 22, 2017

The era of strong leaders - The Economic Times

The era of strong leaders

By Indulekha Aravind , ET Bureau | Updated: Apr 23, 2017, 12.55 AM IST

Putin has served two terms as president and then spent four years as prime minister, before returning to the presidential office in 2012. Putin has served two terms as president and then spent four years as prime minister, before returning to the presidential office in 2012. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s recent referendum to grant his office sweeping powers is being seen as the latest instance of the popular acceptance of the so-called "Strong Leader". But many of these leaders, like Erdogan, have been consolidating their position by amending their country’s constitution, allowing them to continue in office. ET Magazine brings you a snapshot of the leaders currently in power through these means, as well as a look at other controversial rulers down the ages.

More:The era of strong leaders - The Economic Times

Turn and churn in Turkey

Turn and churn in Turkey

A questionable victory and a restless opposition may put Turkey in turmoil and impede the fight against ISIS

More:Turn and churn in Turkey

In Turkey, victory tastes like defeat | GulfNews.com

In Turkey, victory tastes like defeat

It will be important to monitor Erdogan government’s conduct and the political opposition’s response in the near future By Marwan Kabalan, Special to Gulf News Published: 16:20 April 22, 2017 Gulf News Last Sunday, a slight majority (51.4 per cent) of Turkish voters voted in favour of a series of constitutional amendments proposed by the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP). The proposed changes will effectively turn the present parliamentary system into a presidential one.

More:In Turkey, victory tastes like defeat | GulfNews.com

Friday, April 21, 2017

How a Handwritten Note Gave Erdogan an Uncheckable Election Win - Bloomberg

How a Handwritten Note Gave Erdogan an Uncheckable Election Win

by Firat Kozok , Benjamin Harvey , and Marc Champion April 21, 2017

Turkey’s referendum on presidential powers had just finished. Counting was under way. Then, supervisors at more than 167,000 polling stations received an unprecedented order from election central in Ankara.

More:How a Handwritten Note Gave Erdogan an Uncheckable Election Win - Bloomberg

‘Turkey Is Open for Business,’ Says Turkey After Flawed Referendum | Foreign Policy

‘Turkey Is Open for Business,’ Says Turkey After Flawed Referendum

By Emily Tamkin April 21, 2017

‘Turkey Is Open for Business,’ Says Turkey After Flawed Referendum Less than a week after Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan won sweeping new powers for the next twelve years in a referendum widely denounced as unfree and unfair, the Turkish and American business community gathered at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in Washington to pay obeisance to Mehmet Simsek, Turkey’s point man for economic and financial affairs.

More:‘Turkey Is Open for Business,’ Says Turkey After Flawed Referendum | Foreign Policy

Referendum in Turkey Reveals Erdogan Vulnerabilities - SPIEGEL ONLINE

Erdogan Leads His Country into the Abyss

Recep Tayyip Erdogan emerged victorious from last Sunday's referendum, but his slim margin of victory may actually have weakened his rule. Opposition to the Turkish president's power grab is forming and the EU can do little other than stand aside and watch.

More:Referendum in Turkey Reveals Erdogan Vulnerabilities - SPIEGEL ONLINE

Is Turkey Still a Bridge to the West? | The American Conservative

Is Turkey Still a Bridge to the West?

Recep Tayyip Erdogan has destroyed founder Ataturk’s secular heritage and taken his nation down an Islamist path.

More:Is Turkey Still a Bridge to the West? | The American Conservative

Erdogan's Counter-Revolution | The Weekly Standard

Erdogan's Counter-Revolution
What went wrong in Turkey?

May 01, 2017 | By Eric Edelman

The history of the twentieth century is littered with the carcasses of failed revolutions. Lenin, Stalin, Mao, Mussolini, and Hitler all tried to master modernity—to curb or accelerate it—and all failed. After the attacks on September 11, 2001, it appeared the most consequential revolutionary of the last century might turn out to be Mustafa Kemal Pasha, better known as Atatürk, founder of the secular Republic of Turkey. Amidst the wreckage of the multinational Ottoman Empire, Atatürk emerged victorious, using bourgeois nationalism as a basis for reforming a Muslim country in an attempt to demonstrate that popular sovereignty and Islam could successfully coexist. That proposition remains to be disproven, but the Atatürk revolution itself died on April 16, 2017—the day Turkey's current president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, succeeded in his longstanding effort to transform the country's parliamentary government into an executive presidency.

More:Erdogan's Counter-Revolution | The Weekly Standard

The Suffolk Journal : Democracy loses in Turkey

Democracy loses in Turkey

Amy Koczera • April 21, 2017 • Leave a Comment

Turkish citizens voted on Sunday to change their constitution, ultimately granting President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan greater powers than he had before, according to the Washington Post. Citizens voted in favor of an 18-article constitutional reform constructed by the ruling Justice and Development Party that would reconstruct Turkey’s parliamentary system into a powerful executive presidency, according to The Post.

More:The Suffolk Journal : Democracy loses in Turkey

Divided, now rule

Divided, now rule

By expanding his powers through a slim, contested victory in Sunday's referendum, Turkey's Recep Tayyip Erdogan has consolidated his rule – over a nation bound for social turmoil. Diego Cupolo reports from Ankara

More:Divided, now rule

Reconciliation – not a chance!

Reconciliation – not a chance!

The referendum campaign has polarised Turkey in a way rarely seen, but instead of seeking balance and reconciliation, Erdogan immediately announced further referenda on the death penalty and EU accession talks. A risky tactic, argues Ulrich von Schwerin

More:Reconciliation – not a chance!

What's common between Turkish referendum, Brexit and US election?

What's common between Turkish referendum, Brexit and US election?

Given modern Turkey’s secular and democratic history, why have people chosen to abolish the post of Prime Minster?

More:What's common between Turkish referendum, Brexit and US election?

Voters describe intimidation in Turkey’s referendum | TOP STORIES | DW.COM | 21.04.2017

Voters describe intimidation in Turkey’s referendum

Turkey’s referendum to expand presidential powers passed by a slim margin, but results are marred by claims of electoral fraud, which the government has so far dismissed. Diego Cupolo reports from Ankara.

More:Voters describe intimidation in Turkey’s referendum | TOP STORIES | DW.COM | 21.04.2017

Limits to Erdogan’s autocracy - The Jewish Chronicle

Limits to Erdogan’s autocracy

Isolated at the top of a narrow hierarchy, Turkey and its President’s fate are intertwined, writes Anshel Pfeffer

More:Limits to Erdogan’s autocracy - The Jewish Chronicle

Turkey and Trump’s unpredictability

Turkey and Trump's unpredictability
Caroline Glick image

By Caroline Glick —— Bio and Archives April 21, 2017

According to Michael Anton, one of President Donald Trump’s top foreign policy aides, the chief characteristic of Trump’s foreign policy is unpredictability.

On the surface, unpredictability is a great advantage.

More:Turkey and Trump’s unpredictability

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Giuliani says U.S. open to deal on Turkish gold trader case | News | KFGO-790

Giuliani says U.S. open to deal on Turkish gold trader case
Thursday, April 20, 2017 10:37 a.m. CDT

By Nathan Layne

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, hired to resolve criminal charges against Turkish gold trader Reza Zarrab, said in an affidavit that senior U.S. officials are open to a deal that would help his client while promoting the security interests of the United States.

More:Giuliani says U.S. open to deal on Turkish gold trader case | News | KFGO-790

Recep Tayyip Erdogan Asks You to Shut Up - WSJ

Recep Tayyip Erdogan Asks You to Shut Up

The Turkish president has launched a global attack on dissent. His latest target: a Washington analyst.

More:Recep Tayyip Erdogan Asks You to Shut Up - WSJ

Turkey Referendum: Parliamentary System Eroded Through Fraudulent Elections

Turkey Referendum: Parliamentary System Eroded Through Fraudulent Elections

The approval of sweeping changes to Turkey’s political system last Sunday threatens Turkey’s nearly a century and half long parliamentarian legacy, according to Ankara native Evren Celik Wiltse, an assistant professor of political science at South Dakota State University. “Almost all high-ranking bureaucrats are directly appointed by the president. More importantly, the president directly or indirectly determines over 70 percent of the judiciary.”

More:Turkey Referendum: Parliamentary System Eroded Through Fraudulent Elections

Turkey's Strongman Weakens Stocks - Bloomberg Gadfly

Turkey's Strongman Weakens Stocks
By Nir Kaissar

April 20, 2017 12:44 PM EDT

There’s a new strongman in town. Recep Tayyip Erdogan won a referendum on Sunday that gives him broad authority over Turkey’s government, judiciary and economy.

More:Turkey's Strongman Weakens Stocks - Bloomberg Gadfly

Turkey Rapporteur Kati Piri says it's about time EU leaders met with Erdogan

Turkey Rapporteur Kati Piri says it's about time EU leaders met with Erdogan
FAMAGUSTA GAZETTE CYPRUS•
Thursday, 20 April, 2017
Turkey accessions negotiations rapporteur Kati Piri called today the EU leaders to meet with Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan and ask if his country still wants to join the European club in the wake of a referendum that gave him massive powers, according to EUObserver.

More:Turkey Rapporteur Kati Piri says it's about time EU leaders met with Erdogan

A Sad Day For Turkey | The Huffington Post

A Sad Day For Turkey
04/20/2017 10:49 am ET

The razor-thin victory (51.3% to 48.7%) of Turkey’s President Erdogan in the referendum held on April 16 in fact denies Erdogan the mandate to govern with the sweeping powers the new constitution grants the President, especially when the results of the referendum are seriously contested. Even if there was no outright fraud or irregularities in the votes (which by all accounts were rampant), the conditions under which the referendum was held made a mockery of free and fair elections. Given Erdogan’s domestic and foreign policy conduct leading up to the referendum, the US and the EU must now seriously reevaluate Turkey’s role in NATO, its viability as an ally in the fight against ISIS, and its trustworthiness under the presidency of Erdogan.

More:A Sad Day For Turkey | The Huffington Post

Turkey’s Erdogan: Islam’s New Caliph? | CBN News

Turkey’s Erdogan: Islam’s New Caliph?

Fresh from his controversial (and possibly rigged) referendum victory, it appears Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan may now view himself as the chosen successor of a revived Ottoman empire, the Sultan of a new Islamic caliphate.

More:Turkey’s Erdogan: Islam’s New Caliph? | CBN News

John Simpson: In Turkey, Erdogan’s aura of legitimacy has been weakened

John Simpson: In Turkey, Erdogan’s aura of legitimacy has been weakened

If this was indeed a warning from the electorate, Erdogan is unlikely to go quiet and soothe the feelings of the losers.

More:John Simpson: In Turkey, Erdogan’s aura of legitimacy has been weakened

Erdogan’s Pyrrhic Victory – Handelsblatt Global

Erdogan's Pyrrhic Victory

Turkey's president managed to push through reforms that would give him broad powers in a recent referendum. But there is still time to push against authoritarianism, writes professor of international relations Soli Özel.

More:Erdogan’s Pyrrhic Victory – Handelsblatt Global

Turkey, Europe and the Crisis of Democracy – Handelsblatt Global

Turkey, Europe and the Crisis of Democracy

In Germany, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his supporters are regularly accused of opposing democratic values. Torsten Albig, the premier of the German state of Schleswig Holstein, says Europeans also need to take a look in the mirror.

More:Turkey, Europe and the Crisis of Democracy – Handelsblatt Global

How Turkey might have ruined its relationship with the EU

How Turkey might have ruined its relationship with the EU

Top European politicians including Christian Kern and Jean-Claude Juncker were less-than congratulatory towards Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan following the result of last weekend's referendum on his presidential powers

More:How Turkey might have ruined its relationship with the EU

One-man show: Recep Tayyip Erdogan gets the power he has long wanted—at a cost | The Economist

Recep Tayyip Erdogan gets the power he has long wanted—at a cost

ISTANBUL IT WAS a vote that turned out to be as controversial as it was hotly contested. Even before all of the ballots had been counted, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Turkey’s president, stepped in front of a crowd of supporters in Istanbul and proclaimed victory. “My nation stood upright and undivided,” he said, referring to the referendum on a constitution that will give him new, virtually unchecked powers. “April 16th was a victory for all of Turkey.”

More:One-man show: Recep Tayyip Erdogan gets the power he has long wanted—at a cost | The Economist

Turkey, China join hands to revive ancient Silk Road - CCTV News - CCTV.com English

Turkey, China join hands to revive ancient Silk Road

ANKARA, April 19 (Xinhua) -- Turkish President Erdogan told visiting Chinese Vice Premier Liu Yandong Tuesday that he earnestly expects to attend the Belt and Road forum this May and hopes for deepening all-round cooperation with China.

More:Turkey, China join hands to revive ancient Silk Road - CCTV News - CCTV.com English

Turkey's youth fighting back | Euronews

Turkey's youth fighting back

Sulukule is one of Istanbul’s oldest neighbourhoods. Located in the west of the city, it has played home to Turkey’s Roma community for a thousand years.

More:Turkey's youth fighting back | Euronews

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Erdogan's New Powers Do Little to Address Turkey's Old Problems - Bloomberg

Erdogan's New Powers Do Little to Address Turkey's Old Problems
by Isobel Finkel
and Selcan Hacaoglu
April 19, 2017, 10:01 AM EDT

Following a narrow victory in an April 16 referendum on expanding his powers, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan greeted supporters with a fiery speech aimed at critics abroad who questioned the validity of the results. “We don’t care about the opinions of any Hans, George, or Helga,” Erdogan told an ebullient crowd at Bestepe, his sumptuous presidential palace in Ankara four times the size of Versailles. “All debates about the referendum are now over.”

More:Erdogan's New Powers Do Little to Address Turkey's Old Problems - Bloomberg

Erdogan death penalty vow likely to be tough sell in divided Turkey - Channel NewsAsia

Erdogan death penalty vow likely to be tough sell in divided Turkey

Posted 20 Apr 2017 01:20

ISTANBUL: Immediately after winning Sunday's referendum, President Tayyip Erdogan promised to reinstate the death penalty, a reform put in place 15 years ago that was seen as fundamental to Turkey's efforts to join the European Union.

More:Erdogan death penalty vow likely to be tough sell in divided Turkey - Channel NewsAsia

Arthur I. Cyr: Referendum 'victory' may prove costly for Turkey's president

Arthur I. Cyr: Referendum ‘victory’ may prove costly for Turkey’s president
Wednesday

By Arthur I. Cyr

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has probably been weakened rather than strengthened by grasping for even more power. Last summer, he dramatically and personally turned back an attempted military coup, using social media to urge the people of Turkey to resist. That showed courage as well as shrewdness.

More:Arthur I. Cyr: Referendum 'victory' may prove costly for Turkey's president

As Turkey’s Democracy Takes a Hit, Civil Society Must Take Center Stage - Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly

As Turkey’s Democracy Takes a Hit, Civil Society Must Take Center Stage
By Erin Rubin

April 17, 2017; The Conversation

President Erdoğan of Turkey has spent his career building up to the powerful position he now holds, and this week’s vote has concentrated his power even more than was previously possible. On Sunday, Turks voted to reform their constitution in favor of “stability,” removing many of the checks on executive power.

More:As Turkey’s Democracy Takes a Hit, Civil Society Must Take Center Stage - Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly

Washington Post Editorial: Turkey's ugly election | The Salt Lake Tribune

Washington Post Editorial: Turkey’s ugly election

Recep Tayyip Erdogan's ugly win in Sunday's referendum on a new, authoritarian constitution for Turkey creates big problems for the country's secular democratic forces and for Turkey's Western allies — but also for Erdogan himself. His victory was not convincing, as he had hoped, but narrow, contested and tainted by the finding of a European observer mission that the pre-election campaign was not free or fair. Turkey's three biggest cities voted against the would-be strongman. The country is not united behind him, but polarized — a political reality that even an empowered ruler will ignore at his peril.

More:Washington Post Editorial: Turkey's ugly election | The Salt Lake Tribune

Turkey is a lesson in how democracy can end, as if we needed it

Turkey is a lesson in how democracy can end, as if we needed it

With victory in a weekend referendum that delivers him sweeping powers, Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan has provided a timely lesson in how to dismantle a democracy, as if it were needed.

More:Turkey is a lesson in how democracy can end, as if we needed it

Trump to Erdogan: Congrats On Your Dictatorship! | The Nation

Trump to Erdogan: Congrats On Your Dictatorship!

The president’s call to Turkey’s increasingly autocratic leader sends an awful message of disregard for democracy.

More:Trump to Erdogan: Congrats On Your Dictatorship! | The Nation

Why the world will keep questioning the legitimacy of Turkey’s referendum

Why the world will keep questioning the legitimacy of Turkey’s referendum

Recep Erdogan will have powers at his disposal that no other president in developed democracies has.

More:Why the world will keep questioning the legitimacy of Turkey’s referendum

Why is Trump celebrating Turkey's democratic crisis? | MSNBC

Why is Trump celebrating Turkey’s democratic crisis?

04/18/17 08:43 AM—Updated 04/18/17 02:18 PM By Steve Benen

During yesterday’s White House press briefing, Press Secretary Sean Spicer was asked about Turkey’s referendum, and allegations of election irregularities in a process that’s given Recep Tayyip Erdogan sweeping new powers. Spicer was circumspect.

More:Why is Trump celebrating Turkey's democratic crisis? | MSNBC

Recep Tayyip Erdogan won his vote but lost half of Turkey

Recep Tayyip Erdogan won his vote but lost half of Turkey

The one-sided contest gives the president unbridled power but not a clear path

More:Recep Tayyip Erdogan won his vote but lost half of Turkey

Turkish opposition parties find chinks in Erdogan’s armour after referendum

Turkish opposition parties find chinks in Erdogan’s armour after referendum

Meral Aksener leads groups that sense president is not unstoppable

More:Turkish opposition parties find chinks in Erdogan’s armour after referendum

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Turkey's travails - Houston Chronicle

Turkey's travails

Sunday's referendum could be seen as a mandate and undercut the nation's stability.

More:Turkey's travails - Houston Chronicle

Donald Trump Has a Conflict of Interest in Turkey. Just Ask Donald Trump. | Mother Jones

Donald Trump Has a Conflict of Interest in Turkey. Just Ask Donald Trump.

Why the president's congratulatory call to Recep Tayyip Erdogan raises serious questions.

More:Donald Trump Has a Conflict of Interest in Turkey. Just Ask Donald Trump. | Mother Jones

CNN Exclusive: Erdogan insists Turkey reforms don't make him a d - ABC57 News - See the Difference Michiana

CNN Exclusive: Erdogan insists Turkey reforms don't make him a dictator

ANKARA (CNN) -- Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has insisted that his plans to assume sweeping new powers do not make him a dictator.

More:CNN Exclusive: Erdogan insists Turkey reforms don't make him a d - ABC57 News - See the Difference Michiana

Calls for referendum annulment rise in Turkey

Calls for referendum annulment rise in Turkey

Allegations of fraud in Turkey’s April 16 referendum show no signs of abating despite government denials that any irregularity occurred.

More:Calls for referendum annulment rise in Turkey

How to Save Turkey's Democracy From President Erdogan's Autocracy | World Report | US News

Turkey in Crisis

Without an organized opposition, Erdogan's expanded powers may end Turkish democracy.
Turkey in Crisis

By Soner Cagaptay | Opinion Contributor
April 18, 2017, at 9:25 a.m.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's narrow win in Sunday's referendum, which significantly expands his powers, is not promising for Turkey's future.

Following the referendum, Erdogan has become the most powerful Turk since Mustafa Kemal Ataturk founded modern Turkey in 1923. But while half of the country loves Erdogan, the other half loathes him: Herein lies Turkey's crisis.

More:How to Save Turkey's Democracy From President Erdogan's Autocracy | World Report | US News

Turkey: Main Opposition Party Formally Requests Annulment of Referendum Results | Stratfor

Turkey: Main Opposition Party Formally Requests Annulment of Referendum Results
Situation Reports
April 18, 2017 | 13:41 GMT Print

Turkey's main opposition Republican People's Party (CHP), has filed a formal request to annul the results of April 16 referendum on constitutional change, AP reported April 18. The ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) and President Recep Tayyip Erdogan won a hairline victory in the vote. The constitutional amendments will greatly empower the presidency. The opposition and international observers have called the vote's legitimacy into question. The European Commission also called on April 18 for Turkey to investigate election irregularities. The referendum has shown just how deeply polarized the Turkish electorate has become: Erdogan has eked out a victory despite losing the three largest cities in the vote — Istanbul, Ankara, and Izmir. The AKP's razor-thin lead is a big reason why Erdogan feels compelled to resort to extraordinary measures to consolidate power.

More:Turkey: Main Opposition Party Formally Requests Annulment of Referendum Results | Stratfor

Referendum in Turkey: The Bizarre Behavior of Turkish German Voters - SPIEGEL ONLINE

The Bizarre Behavior of Turkish-German Voters

A clear majority of Turkish voters in Germany cast ballots in favor of Erdogan's presidential system -- many out of spite for the country. The development reveals how far immigrants from Turkey still have to go before they will be integrated at the center of society.

More:Referendum in Turkey: The Bizarre Behavior of Turkish German Voters - SPIEGEL ONLINE

Divided, now rule

Divided, now rule

By expanding his powers through a slim, contested victory in Sunday's referendum, Turkey's Recep Tayyip Erdogan has consolidated his rule – over a nation bound for social turmoil. Diego Cupolo reports from Ankara

More:Divided, now rule

Erdogan Says He Doesn’t Care What Europe Thinks About Turkey’s Vote - Bloomberg

Erdogan Says He Doesn’t Care What Europe Thinks About Turkey’s Vote
by Isobel Finkel
April 17, 2017, 2:24 PM EDT

Serious Problems to Come for Turkey, Says Former Lawmaker

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan treated a crowd of supporters gathered outside his presidential palace on Monday evening to a speech laced with invective against Europe, saying his victory in a referendum on Sunday took place under conditions that were democratic beyond compare.

More:Erdogan Says He Doesn’t Care What Europe Thinks About Turkey’s Vote - Bloomberg

Turkey: the European response

Turkey: the European response

by: Duncan Robinson

It was a tricky result. Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan scraped a narrow victory – 51.4 per cent – in a referendum to hand himself more powers, amid concerns over the veracity of the vote.

More:Turkey: the European response

Understanding Turkey’s Anger With The West

Understanding Turkey’s Anger With The West

by Cemal Ozkahraman on 18 April 2017

‘Who starts up in anger sits down with a loss’ (Öfkeyle kalkan zararla oturur) is a profound Turkish proverb. However, the wisdom of the proverb has not prevented recent Turkish anger with the West, the European Union (EU) in particular, and most specifically Germany and Holland. So why has Turkey become so annoyed with EU countries, when from its creation it adopted western civilization and strove to join the EU club, and has already made a number of economic and security agreements with the West?

More:Understanding Turkey’s Anger With The West

Morning Star :: Turkey on the road to fascism | The People’s Daily

Turkey on the road to fascism

Apr 2017 Tuesday 18th posted by Morning Star in Editorial TURKEY’S constitutional changes endorsed in Sunday’s referendum threaten to take that country further down the road to fascism.

More:Morning Star :: Turkey on the road to fascism | The People’s Daily

Turkey referendum: 2.5 million votes may have been manipulated

Turkey referendum: 2.5 million votes may have been manipulated

Monitors say the scale of possible manipulation would be enough to overturn the outcome of the referendum.

More:Turkey referendum: 2.5 million votes may have been manipulated

bne IntelliNews - Academic: “Never-AKP” vote disappeared in Turkey’s referendum

Academic: “Never-AKP” vote disappeared in Turkey’s referendum

By Ben Aris in Berlin April 18, 2017

A group of voters who demonstrate hard-core opposition to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and have never voted for his Justice and Development Party (AKP) in any election seemed to disappear when it came to the historic April 16 referendum that handed the president expanded powers.

More:bne IntelliNews - Academic: “Never-AKP” vote disappeared in Turkey’s referendum

Monday, April 17, 2017

Under Erdogan, Turkey has receded from the democratic world | The Independent

Under Erdogan, Turkey has receded from the democratic world

He will have the same sort of powers of an executive presidency as the French and American systems allow, but nowhere near the same checks and balances

More:Under Erdogan, Turkey has receded from the democratic world | The Independent

Turkey divided: protesters fill streets in Istanbul and Ankara | Euronews

Turkey divided: protesters fill streets in Istanbul and Ankara

Thousands have taken to the streets of Istanbul to protest against the outcome of the referendum in Turkey.

Some chanting ‘thief, Erdogan’ and ‘no to the presidency’ showed their anger at the Yes victory to change the constitution and grant sweeping powers to the president.

More:Turkey divided: protesters fill streets in Istanbul and Ankara | Euronews

Turkey's shell-shocked opposition struggles to find a way forwar - ABC57 News - See the Difference Michiana

Turkey's shell-shocked opposition struggles to find a way forward
Posted: Apr 17, 2017 8:00 PM EST
Updated: Apr 17, 2017 8:00 PM EST
by Kara Fox CNN

ANKARA, Turkey (CNN) -- Turkish citizens who did not want to give more powers to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan had a very hard Monday.

More:Turkey's shell-shocked opposition struggles to find a way forwar - ABC57 News - See the Difference Michiana

Erdogan's Referendum Victory Leaves Turkey More Divided | Time.com

Erdogan's Victory in the Referendum on His Powers Will Leave Turkey Even More Divided
Jared Malsin / Istanbul
Apr 16, 2017

Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan claimed victory on Sunday in a referendum on a proposal to massively expand his power, while dismissing the objections of opposition parties who challenged the outcome of the vote.

More:Erdogan's Referendum Victory Leaves Turkey More Divided | Time.com

Thousands of 'No' supporters protest Turkey vote in Istanbul

Thousands of 'No' supporters protest Turkey vote in Istanbul
[AFP News]

Thousands of supporters of the 'No' campaign in the referendum on granting Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan greater powers took to the streets of Istanbul late Monday to protest alleged poll violations.

More:Thousands of 'No' supporters protest Turkey vote in Istanbul

Erdogan's referendum win no clean sweep

Erdogan's referendum win no clean sweep

Turkey’s April 16 popular referendum amending the constitution to establish an executive presidency passed 51.41% to 48.59%. The results were virtually identical to the estimates of Turkey’s two leading polling firms, Gezici and Konda.

More:Erdogan's referendum win no clean sweep

Erdogan puts emergency rule extension at top of agenda

Erdogan puts emergency rule extension at top of agenda

Opponents fear greater autocracy from newly empowered president

More:Erdogan puts emergency rule extension at top of agenda

A bitter victory for Turkey’s new sultan

A bitter victory for Turkey’s new sultan

The EU must find a way to reframe its essential dealings with Ankara

More:A bitter victory for Turkey’s new sultan

Erdogan’s referendum victory will make Turkey prey for the country’s many enemies | The Independent

Erdogan’s referendum victory will make Turkey prey for the country’s many enemies

Turkey is surrounded by many actual or potential enemies – Syrian, Kurdish, Iranian, Russian – who see how easy it will be to exploit and exacerbate the country’s deep divisions

More:Erdogan’s referendum victory will make Turkey prey for the country’s many enemies | The Independent

Turkey referendum: Erdogan dismisses criticism by monitors - BBC News

Turkey referendum: Erdogan dismisses criticism by monitors

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has rejected criticism by monitors who say the referendum campaign fell short of international standards.

More:Turkey referendum: Erdogan dismisses criticism by monitors - BBC News

How Erdogan's Victory Might Be Europe's Defeat :: The Investigative Project on Terrorism

How Erdogan's Victory Might Be Europe's Defeat

by Abigail R. Esman

Over lunch in Istanbul last week, a friend and I spoke about the upcoming Turkish referendum. "Many European Turks are likely to vote 'yes,'" I cautioned my friend, whom I knew was planning to vote 'no,' or against the measure to grant President Recep Tayyip Erdogan unlimited powers. A "yes" vote, by contrast, would end the democratic parliamentary government established by Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, the founder of the republic, and in the eyes of most Western leaders, establish Erdogan as the Muslim world's newest dictator.

More:How Erdogan's Victory Might Be Europe's Defeat :: The Investigative Project on Terrorism

Erdogan Wins Turkey's Referendum—But His Problems Are Far from Over | The National Interest

Erdogan Wins Turkey's Referendum—But His Problems Are Far from Over

President Erdoğan has achieved his long-cherished ambition to be acknowledged as the uncrowned sultan of Turkey. However, his goal has been attained at great cost to the country. Turkey is divided down the middle regarding the wisdom of this course. A referendum, changing the constitution to a presidential system with almost unbridled powers for the chief executive, passed on Sunday with the barest majority—51 to 49 percent. Moreover, the CHP, the leading opposition party, is demanding a recount of up to 60 percent of the ballots cast, saying that unstamped voting papers were considered valid.

More:Erdogan Wins Turkey's Referendum—But His Problems Are Far from Over | The National Interest

One man show: Erdogan claims victory in Turkey’s referendum | The Economist

Erdogan claims victory in Turkey’s referendum

EVEN before all the votes had been tallied, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Turkey’s president, claimed victory. “My nation stood upright and undivided,” he said of the referendum on a new constitution giving the presidency immense new powers. “April 16th was a victory for all of Turkey.”

More:One man show: Erdogan claims victory in Turkey’s referendum | The Economist

"Controversial Turkish Constitutional Referendum Results" by Kader Sevinc - CHP EU Representation - BrusselsCHP EU Representation – Brussels

“Controversial Turkish Constitutional Referendum Results” by Kader Sevinc
Posted on April 17, 2017 by chpbrussels

This was the unofficial result of Constitutional Referendum on April 16, 2017 in Turkey:

‘Yes’: %51,4 / ‘No’: %48,6 and turnout exceeded 80%

These results are highly controversial. We are going to contest at least 37 per cent of the ballot boxes over suspicious vote tampering.

More:"Controversial Turkish Constitutional Referendum Results" by Kader Sevinc - CHP EU Representation - BrusselsCHP EU Representation – Brussels

Turkey’s divisive referendum: Anatolia vs the metropolis - SERKAN DEMİRTAŞ

Turkey’s divisive referendum: Anatolia vs the metropolis

Turkey’s most important referendum that resulted in a shift to an executive presidency produced a major controversy with both “yes” and “no” camps claiming victory because the results were so close and the latter announcing that it would issue complaints about the irregularities during the voting and counting processes.

More:Turkey’s divisive referendum: Anatolia vs the metropolis - SERKAN DEMİRTAŞ

Here’s How Turkey Lurched from Democracy Toward Dictatorship - The Daily Beast

Here’s How Turkey Lurched from Democracy Toward Dictatorship

ISTANBUL — Turkey’s move to abandon parliamentary democracy and adopt one-man rule fulfills a long-held dream of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who not only expands his powers but also gets a chance to stay in office for another 15 years if, as expected, the current referendum ballot count holds up.

More:Here’s How Turkey Lurched from Democracy Toward Dictatorship - The Daily Beast

How the Turkish referendum has split the community in Australia

How the Turkish referendum has split the community in Australia

The historic constitutional referendum in Turkey on Sunday resulted in a marginal victory, 51 per cent, for the incumbent president Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his ruling AK Party.

More:How the Turkish referendum has split the community in Australia

Turkey’s No campaign is not going to take its defeat lying down | The Independent

Turkey’s No campaign is not going to take its defeat lying down

Yesterday was the day Turkey shed away the few remaining checks and balances that made it a recognizably Western parliamentary democracy.

More:Turkey’s No campaign is not going to take its defeat lying down | The Independent

EU observer in Turkey condemns referendum as 'neither fair nor free' | The Independent

EU observer in Turkey condemns referendum as 'neither fair nor free'

European delegation 'deeply worried' as opposition calls for result to be annulled

More:EU observer in Turkey condemns referendum as 'neither fair nor free' | The Independent

Sunday, April 16, 2017

Here’s why Turkish opposition parties are contesting the referendum results - The Washington Post

Here’s why Turkish opposition parties are contesting the referendum results
By Jennifer Amur April 16 at 4:35 PM

Just as polls were closing Sunday in Turkey for a referendum on constitutional amendments that would broaden the president's powers, the country's election authority took an unusual step: It lifted a rule requiring that each ballot have an official seal.

More:Here’s why Turkish opposition parties are contesting the referendum results - The Washington Post

EU calls on Turkey to seek broadest possible national consensus - Xinhua | English.news.cn

EU calls on Turkey to seek broadest possible national consensus
Source: Xinhua 2017-04-17 06:24:46 [More]

BRUSSELS, April 16 (Xinhua) -- The European Union(EU) on Sunday called on the Turkish authorities to seek the broadest possible national consensus.

More:EU calls on Turkey to seek broadest possible national consensus - Xinhua | English.news.cn

Referendum shakes, if not shatters, Turks' trust in their democracy - Turkey - Haaretz

Analysis Turkey's Referendum Shakes, if Not Shatters, Turks' Trust in Their Democracy

Erdogan claims a win in a Turkey that is split down the middle ■ Surprising pro-Erdogan results in country's Kurdish regions raise questions

More:Referendum shakes, if not shatters, Turks' trust in their democracy - Turkey - Haaretz

Istanbul on edge as Turkey’s president claims victory in a referendum that would grant him immense power – VICE News

Istanbul on the edge
By Kaya Genc on Apr 16, 2017

ISTANBUL, Turkey — April 16 felt like the first day of summer in the city. A bright day with lots of sun; streets bustling with people on their way to local schools used as polling stations; the sense of immense excitement about the results of Sunday’s presidential referendum palpable in the air.

More:Istanbul on edge as Turkey’s president claims victory in a referendum that would grant him immense power – VICE News

Turkish democracy has just died; Europe could not have saved it | Coffee House

Turkish democracy has just died; Europe could not have saved it
Douglas Murray

16 April 2017

Well farewell then Turkey. Or at least, farewell the Turkey of Kemal Ataturk. It’s a shame. Ataturk-ism nearly made its own centenary.

More:Turkish democracy has just died; Europe could not have saved it | Coffee House

Turkish President Erdogan declares referendum win, critics claim fraud - The Globe and Mail

Turkish President Erdogan declares referendum win, critics claim fraud

Elena Becatoros, Suzan Fraser And Zeynep Bilginsoy

ISTANBUL — The Associated Press

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared victory in Sunday’s referendum that will grant sweeping powers to the presidency, hailing the result as a “historic decision.”

More:Turkish President Erdogan declares referendum win, critics claim fraud - The Globe and Mail

Saturday, April 15, 2017

Turkey launches investigation into 17 US politicians, bureaucrats and academics over last year's attempted coup | The Independent

Turkey launches investigation into 17 US politicians, bureaucrats and academics over last year's attempted coup

Those named include the former CIA director John Brennan and Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer

More:Turkey launches investigation into 17 US politicians, bureaucrats and academics over last year's attempted coup | The Independent

Will Turkey's Referendum Mark the End of Democracy and the Birth of 'Erdoğanistan'?

Will Turkey’s Referendum Mark the End of Democracy and the Birth of ‘Erdoğanistan’?
By Simon P. Watmough and Ahmet Erdi Ozturk on 15/04/2017 • Leave a comment

Turkey is approaching a critical juncture in its long-term political development. Irrespective of the outcome, the country’s April 16 referendum, which proposes changing the constitution to concentrate power in the hands of the president, heralds a new political era. The Conversation

More:Will Turkey's Referendum Mark the End of Democracy and the Birth of 'Erdoğanistan'?

As Turkey Goes to Vote, Gulenist 'Traitors' Speak Out - The Atlantic

As Turkey Gears Up to Vote, Its 'Traitors' Speak Out

The referendum may empower a president who has turned their lives into a never-ending nightmare since July’s failed coup.

More:As Turkey Goes to Vote, Gulenist 'Traitors' Speak Out - The Atlantic

How Erdogan transformed Turkey's democracy in a decade - CNN.com

How Erdogan transformed Turkey's democracy in a decade By Angela Dewan, CNN Updated

(CNN)Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has steered his country through a period of extraordinary change. The country's economic rise has been meteoric, lifting millions of people out of poverty, but it's also suffered a stream of deadly terror attacks and a failed military coup last year, which prompted a clampdown on civil liberties.

More:How Erdogan transformed Turkey's democracy in a decade - CNN.com

Turkish Referendum Could Cement Power For Erdoğan And Russia – Analysis – Eurasia Review

Turkish Referendum Could Cement Power For Erdoğan And Russia – Analysis

By YaleGlobal Online

Rise of right-wing populism in Europe, fear of refugees, Erdoğan’s post-coup embrace raise Putin’s international standing.

More:Turkish Referendum Could Cement Power For Erdoğan And Russia – Analysis – Eurasia Review

Ahead of referendum, Europeans boycott Turkey and tourism suffers

Ahead of referendum, Europeans boycott Turkey and tourism suffers

ISTANBUL — This historic city that straddles Europe and Asia has long profited from being one of the world's top tourist attractions, especially for Europeans who would throng to the Sultanahmet district that is home to the Hagia Sophia museum, Blue Mosque, Topkapi Palace and the Grand Bazaar

More:Ahead of referendum, Europeans boycott Turkey and tourism suffers

Friday, April 14, 2017

President Erdogan rules out federal system in Turkey after controversy- The New Indian Express

President Erdogan rules out federal system in Turkey after controversy

By AFP | Published: 14th April 2017 10:02 PM |

ANKARA: President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Friday ruled out introducing any federal system in Turkey, after an angry backlash to comments by an advisor from nationalists key to his success in this weekend's referendum.

More:President Erdogan rules out federal system in Turkey after controversy- The New Indian Express

How Kurds Could Tilt Turkey's Referendum

How Kurds Could Tilt Turkey's Referendum
By Ayla Jean Yackley
http://foreignpolicy.com
Posted 2017-04-13 21:12 GMT

ISTANBUL -- Turkey's most outspoken opponent of a referendum that promises to transform this NATO ally is sitting out the campaign behind bars.

More:How Kurds Could Tilt Turkey's Referendum

Turkish women's rights are at stake in Sunday's elections | Public Radio International

Turkish women's rights are at stake in Sunday's elections

For most of the last century, Turkey has been the go-to example of an Islamic country functioning as a secular democracy, where women enjoy vast freedoms rare across much of the Middle East.

More:Turkish women's rights are at stake in Sunday's elections | Public Radio International

Turkey’s Referendum: Free and Fair? | The Huffington Post

Turkey’s Referendum: Free and Fair?
04/14/2017 11:52 am ET

Turks will vote on Sunday in a referendum to amend the constitution, and establish an executive presidency, eliminating checks and balances. The referendum will change the way Turkey is governed, establishing one-man rule and transforming Turkey into a dictatorship.

More:Turkey’s Referendum: Free and Fair? | The Huffington Post

MEDICAL TOURISM IN TURKEY: SECTOR OUTLOOK & FORECAST – MilTech

MEDICAL TOURISM IN TURKEY: SECTOR OUTLOOK & FORECAST

Turkey is fast becoming one of the major destinations for medical tourism dueto the low treatment prices as compared to other nations. A secure and safe environment, established hospitals, skilled doctors and right climate conditions are some of the factors that determine the potential of a medical tourism destination.

More:MEDICAL TOURISM IN TURKEY: SECTOR OUTLOOK & FORECAST – MilTech

Divided nationalists hold key for Erdogan in Turkey vote - Newspaper - DAWN.COM

Divided nationalists hold key for Erdogan in Turkey vote

ANKARA: To mark the 20th anniversary this month of the death of Alparslan Turkes, the founder of modern Turkish nationalism, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan visited his grave in Ankara and offered prayers.

More:Divided nationalists hold key for Erdogan in Turkey vote - Newspaper - DAWN.COM

AP Photos: The mausoleum of Turkey's founding father Ataturk - ABC News

AP Photos: The mausoleum of Turkey's founding father Ataturk

By lefteris pitarakis, associated press

ANKARA, Turkey — Apr 14, 2017, 5:51 AM ET

The Associated Press
In this March 29, 2017 photo, Turkish military honour guards perform the hourly changing of the guard at the mausoleum of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, the founder of modern Turkey in Ankara, Turkey. The legacy of the man whose surname means "father of Turks" was one of a modern, secular, western-leaning Turkey. But the personality cult that grew around him has very gradually been fading as current President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, in power since 2003 as alternately prime minister and president, has harked back to the glory days of the height of the Ottoman Empire to whip up patriotic sentiment.

For generations, Turks have revered their nation's founding father, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, who carved out modern Turkey from the ashes of the Ottoman Empire in the wake of World War I, and his mausoleum in Ankara is a place of pilgrimage for many.

More:AP Photos: The mausoleum of Turkey's founding father Ataturk - ABC News

In Turkey, a Different Kind of Presidential Vote | Stratfor

In Turkey, a Different Kind of Presidential Vote
Analysis
April 14, 2017 | 09:30 GMT Print

Whether the April 16 referendum on constitutional reform passes or fails, the ruling Justice and Development Party will keep pursuing its domestic and foreign policy goals to address Turkey's security concerns.
Those concerns, combined with economic instability, will divide Turkish voters over the referendum.
If the referendum passes, the constitutional reforms will transform the country's government and grant the presidency more power than ever before.

Analysis

Since its founding in 2001, Turkey's ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) has slowly amassed greater and greater power in the country. The party has won pluralities in every legislative election over the past 16 years, and today, it is Turkey's most influential political force. But for President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, bringing the parliament under the AKP's control was only a means to an end. The president's ultimate goal is to increase the executive branch's power.

More:In Turkey, a Different Kind of Presidential Vote | Stratfor

The Decline and Fall of Turkish Democracy - The Atlantic

The Decline and Fall of Turkish Democracy

How a constitutional referendum could give President Recep Tayyip Erdogan undisputed power

More:The Decline and Fall of Turkish Democracy - The Atlantic

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Turkey's anti-Erdogan protests ten years on | The Week UK

Turkey's anti-Erdogan protests ten years on
Apr 13, 2017
What's changed since the mass demonstrations against the Turkish President on 14 April 2007?

More:Turkey's anti-Erdogan protests ten years on | The Week UK

Turkey Is About To Hold A Vote That Could Change The Country Forever | The Huffington Post

Turkey Is About To Hold A Vote That Could Change The Country Forever

A referendum could give its increasingly authoritarian president sweeping new power.

More:Turkey Is About To Hold A Vote That Could Change The Country Forever | The Huffington Post

Academic voices her fears for Turkey ahead of referendum - BBC News

Academic voices her fears for Turkey ahead of referendum

13 April 2017 Last updated at 08:57 BST

Turkish voters are set to cast their ballots in a referendum on a new draft constitution on 16 April.

More:Academic voices her fears for Turkey ahead of referendum - BBC News

Globe editorial: Say no to Erdogan’s naked power grab - The Globe and Mail

Globe editorial: Say no to Erdogan’s naked power grab

On Sunday, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey hopes to win a referendum that would neuter the country’s parliamentary democracy and transform him into an “executive president.”

More:Globe editorial: Say no to Erdogan’s naked power grab - The Globe and Mail

Turkish referendum result could make or break Erdogan | Euronews

Turkish referendum result could make or break Erdogan

Sunday’s referendum vote could result in Turkey’s most significant political development since the Turkish republic was declared in 1923.

More:Turkish referendum result could make or break Erdogan | Euronews

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Turkey prepares for 2026 Winter Olympic bid | OlympicTalk

Turkey prepares for 2026 Winter Olympic bid

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says the country is considering a bid to host the 2026 Winter Olympics in the eastern provinces of Erzurum, Erzincan and Kars.

More:Turkey prepares for 2026 Winter Olympic bid | OlympicTalk

The Permanent State of Crisis in Turkey - WSJ

The Permanent State of Crisis in Turkey

Erdogan has created a deeply divided society that may never be able to resolve its differences.

More:The Permanent State of Crisis in Turkey - WSJ

Erdogan's Turkey - BBC News

Erdogan's Turkey
By Mark Lowen
13 April 2017
Turkey is about to decide what sort of country it wants to be.

A referendum could increase the president’s power.

But how much has Turkey already changed, moulded by the vision of one man?
Turning-point

Some guests were awoken by the gunshots, others by the buzzing of three Black Hawk helicopters.

More:Erdogan's Turkey - BBC News

The Putinisation of Erdogan | Middle East Eye

The Putinisation of Erdogan
#TurkeyChooses

Is Turkey following the path Russia took in weakening parliament and strengthening the presidency?

At what point in the last 15 years of power did Recep Tayyip Erdogan decide that he alone held his country’s destiny in his hands? When did he start comparing himself with Ataturk and pull up the drawbridge?

More:The Putinisation of Erdogan | Middle East Eye

No turning Erdogan, regardless of the upcoming referendum

No turning Erdogan, regardless of the upcoming referendum
12.04.2017

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan hopes to cement his role as the country's modern, unchallenged leader, as he furiously campaigns for a referendum on Sunday. The up or down vote will either see him witness a stunning setback or ensure his presidential powers are vastly expanded.

More:No turning Erdogan, regardless of the upcoming referendum

ESISC - The Clock is Ticking for Turkish Secularization and EU Membership...

ESISC - The Clock is Ticking for Turkish Secularization and EU Membership

BRUSSELS, April 12, 2017 /PRNewswire/ --

European Strategic Intelligence and Security Center - a think tank specializing in collecting and analyzing sources of intelligence in the areas of security, geopolitics and economy - has published an article on the upcoming, and highly controversial, Turkish constitutional referendum.

More:ESISC - The Clock is Ticking for Turkish Secularization and EU Membership...

Turkish diaspora vote crucial as referendum ‘could go either way’ – EURACTIV.com

Turkish diaspora vote crucial as referendum ‘could go either way’

By Georgi Gotev | EURACTIV.com with Reuters and AFP

Turks living abroad are turning out in greater numbers to vote in a referendum on changing the constitution to create an executive presidency, President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan said yesterday (11 April), a development that pollsters say could benefit him.

More:Turkish diaspora vote crucial as referendum ‘could go either way’ – EURACTIV.com

Halkbank CEO is officially added to “the circle” of Zarrab in a new superseding indictment - WASHINGTON HATTI

Halkbank CEO is officially added to “the circle” of Zarrab in a new superseding indictment

By Ilhan Tanir, Washington, DC

As expected, the indictment of Deputy General Secretary of Halkbank, Mehmet Hakan Atilla who was arrested in New York at the end of March is combined with that of Reza Zarrab.

More:Halkbank CEO is officially added to “the circle” of Zarrab in a new superseding indictment - WASHINGTON HATTI

For supporters, Erdogan 'can't ever have enough power' | New Straits Times | Malaysia General Business Sports and Lifestyle News

For supporters, Erdogan 'can't ever have enough power' #HAYIR

ISTANBUL: Recep Tugcu is convinced: ever since “Tayyip” has been in power, Turkey is living through “its golden age.” So he has no hesitation in voting ‘Yes’ in Sunday’s referendum on expanding the president’s powers.

More:For supporters, Erdogan 'can't ever have enough power' | New Straits Times | Malaysia General Business Sports and Lifestyle News

Turkey: Growing on resilience

Turkey: Growing on resilience

Jozef de Coster

Turkey has been beset with problems for a while. But since the referendum of 2016, the country's economy has been stabilising. Turkey's textiles and apparel industry, which exports mostly to the European Union, has shown remarkable resilience in times of turmoil, reports Jozef De Coster from the ground.

More:Turkey: Growing on resilience

Istanbul: A city divided ahead of Turkey referendum - CNN.com

Istanbul: A city divided ahead of Turkey referendum #HAYIR

By Kara Fox, CNN

Updated 8:07 AM ET, Wed April 12, 2017

Istanbul (CNN)Turkish voters will cast their ballots on Sunday in a referendum that could radically alter the way the country is governed.
If Turkey backs the referendum, the country's parliamentary system will turn into a presidential one, effectively consolidating the power of its legislative bodies into one executive branch with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as its primary executor.

More:Istanbul: A city divided ahead of Turkey referendum - CNN.com

Fearing for future, some Turks seek new lives abroad | Reuters

Fearing for future, some Turks seek new lives abroad

By Ceyda Caglayan | ISTANBUL

Lawyer Savas Ersoy and his wife turned down many chances to leave Turkey and work abroad. But after a failed coup, a wave of bombs and the referendum on expanding presidential powers on Sunday, they are packing their bags.

More:Fearing for future, some Turks seek new lives abroad | Reuters

Istanbul Welcomes Bets of Mystery Trader Known as `The Dude' - Bloomberg

Istanbul Welcomes Bets of Mystery Trader Known as `The Dude'
by Tugce Ozsoy
and Kerim Karakaya
April 12, 2017, 12:01 PM EDT

Istanbul’s stock exchange is delighted to be attracting the attentions of a mysterious trader known locally as “The Dude.”

More:Istanbul Welcomes Bets of Mystery Trader Known as `The Dude' - Bloomberg

Turkey’s referendum: Turkey is sliding into dictatorship | The Economist

Turkey is sliding into dictatorship

Recep Tayyip Erdogan is carrying out the harshest crackdown in decades. The West must not abandon Turkey

More:Turkey’s referendum: Turkey is sliding into dictatorship | The Economist

Turkey’s lose-lose referendum – POLITICO

Turkey’s lose-lose referendum

Erdoğan will pursue his march toward one-man rule no matter the outcome of the April vote.

By Sevgi Akarçeşme

4/12/17, 4:15 AM CET

No matter the outcome of Turkey’s referendum on constitutional reform Sunday, there is no good option left for the country’s people.

More:Turkey’s lose-lose referendum – POLITICO

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Not a very fair referendum campaign, is it? - MURAT YETKİN

Not a very fair referendum campaign, is it?

Main opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP) head Kemal Kılıçdaroğlu has long complained that public broadcaster TRT is not giving sufficient coverage to his “No” rallies, ahead of the April 16 referendum on shifting Turkey to an executive presidential system as pushed by President Tayyip Erdoğan.

More:Not a very fair referendum campaign, is it? - MURAT YETKİN

Erdogan takes on Ataturk | World | DW.COM | 11.04.2017

Erdogan takes on Ataturk

The presidential system Recep Tayyip Erdogan strives for will not just change Turkey's political landscape. By tying in Islamic tradition, he becomes an opponent of modern Turkey's founder, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk.

More:Erdogan takes on Ataturk | World | DW.COM | 11.04.2017

The stakes are huge in Turkey’s referendum

The stakes are huge in Turkey’s referendum

Erdogan has to fight for votes but, if he does win, the course set will be very hard

More:The stakes are huge in Turkey’s referendum

Why Turkey must say No to Erdogan | Free speech | Liberties | Politics | spiked

Why Turkey must say No to Erdogan

Deniz Karaman

A Yes vote in next week’s constitutional referendum would destroy Turkish democracy.
While, in recent decades, the Middle East has been characterised by a surge in instability and authoritarianism, Turkey has been regarded as one of the free, democratic exceptions. At the turn of the century, Turkey began its accession process with the EU, beginning a liberalising trend with the aim of moving towards full membership. The Turkish parliament passed laws which strengthened freedom of expression, ended the death penalty, and finally recognised the Kurds as a legitimate ethnic group, allowing them to speak and broadcast in their dialects without facing persecution.

More:Why Turkey must say No to Erdogan | Free speech | Liberties | Politics | spiked

Erdogan relies on well-oiled election machine to secure victory

Erdogan relies on well-oiled election machine to secure victory

Referendum win would cement his role as most powerful president in Turkey’s history

More:Erdogan relies on well-oiled election machine to secure victory

Turkey will never be the same after this vote - The Washington Post

Turkey will never be the same after this vote
By Henri Barkey April 11 at 8:29 AM

On April 16, Turkish voters will be casting votes in the most consequential referendum of modern Turkish history. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) are urging Turks to vote “yes” to constitutional changes that will change Turkey from a parliamentary system to a presidential one.

More:Turkey will never be the same after this vote - The Washington Post

Voter uncertainty in Ankara′s slum areas | All media content | DW.COM | 11.04.2017

Voter uncertainty in Ankara's slum areas

In Ankara’s low-income districts, residents have seen increased benefits and social services under President Erdogan, but many remain undecided on expanding his powers in the upcoming referendum. Diego Cupolo reports.

More:Voter uncertainty in Ankara′s slum areas | All media content | DW.COM | 11.04.2017

Russia tells airlines it may suspend charter flights to Turkey - source | Reuters

Russia tells airlines it may suspend charter flights to Turkey - source

Russia may suspend charter flights to Turkey due to the "difficult political situation" there, the Federal Air Transport Agency has warned airlines, a source at one of the companies told Reuters.

More:Russia tells airlines it may suspend charter flights to Turkey - source | Reuters

How Europe is being used in the Turkish referendum campaign | Euronews

How Europe is being used in the Turkish referendum campaign

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has been accused of using Europe as a whipping post in his campaign to win support for radical constitutional change in Sunday’s referendum.

More:How Europe is being used in the Turkish referendum campaign | Euronews

Turkish language still far away from official EU status – EURACTIV.com

Turkish language still far away from official EU status

By Sam Morgan | EURACTIV.com

In early 2016, Cyprus asked the EU to recognise Turkish as an official language, in an attempt to boost its reunification process. Over one year later, this request has made little headway.

More:Turkish language still far away from official EU status – EURACTIV.com

Monday, April 10, 2017

How Turkey's 'hasty' support for US missile strike could backfire

How Turkey's 'hasty' support for US missile strike could backfire

The physical damage the United States inflicted on a Syrian air base last week wasn't extensive, but there are significant repercussions.

More:How Turkey's 'hasty' support for US missile strike could backfire

Turkey referendum: Critics abroad fear Erdogan's reach - BBC News

Turkey referendum: Critics abroad fear Erdogan's reach

How do Turks in the Netherlands feel about Turkey's controversial referendum on 16 April? Turks living abroad are already voting - deciding whether to give President Recep Tayyip Erdogan sweeping new powers.

More:Turkey referendum: Critics abroad fear Erdogan's reach - BBC News

Erdogan Needs Enemies More Than Friends | The Cipher Brief

Erdogan Needs Enemies More Than Friends
April 7, 2017 | Soner Cagaptay

The Newsletter

On April 16, Turkey will hold a constitutional referendum, which if passed, promises to transform the country’s governing system. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan stands to gain expansive new executive powers - powers that critics say will create a de facto dictatorship in Turkey. For his part, Erdogan has branded many opponents of the referendum as terrorists and enemies of the state. The Cipher Brief’s Fritz Lodge spoke with Soner Cagaptay, director of the Turkish Research Program at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, about Erdogan’s goals in the referendum vote, and what he is willing to sacrifice to get to “Yes.”

More:Erdogan Needs Enemies More Than Friends | The Cipher Brief

Moody’s revises up growth forecast for Turkey, highlights strong need for reform - ECONOMICS

Moody’s revises up growth forecast for Turkey, highlights strong need for reform

ISTANBUL/LONDON

Moody’s has revised up its 2017 and 2018 growth forecasts for Turkey following a stronger-than-expected 2016 growth data, but added that Turkey’s economic rebound would unlikely last without the realization of key structural reforms.

More:Moody’s revises up growth forecast for Turkey, highlights strong need for reform - ECONOMICS

Sunday, April 09, 2017

'It’s a power struggle — like Game of Thrones': Turks in London uneasy over referendum result as voting comes to a close - South West Londoner

‘It’s a power struggle — like Game of Thrones’: Turks in London uneasy over referendum result as voting comes to a close

By Anahita Hossein-Pour

April 9 2017, 15:00
Follow @SW_Londoner

‘Only God knows’, a consulate officer said when asked about the expected result of the upcoming referendum on whether to change Turkey’s political system from a parliamentary structure to a presidential one.

More:'It’s a power struggle — like Game of Thrones': Turks in London uneasy over referendum result as voting comes to a close - South West Londoner

Friday, April 07, 2017

Erdogan – the expert on democracy

Erdogan – the expert on democracy

In likening present-day Germany to the Nazi era, Recep Tayyip Erdogan demonstrates that his ignorance of Germany is on a par with his ignorance of Nazism. As the Lebanese journalist Hazem Saghieh writes, it is a glaring example of the illiteracy that is prevalent among politicians in the Middle East

More:Erdogan – the expert on democracy

Pro Erdogan Sites Take Aim at Critics in Germany - SPIEGEL ONLINE

Pro-Erdogan Sites Take Aim at Critics in Germany

Websites like the Ottoman Generation and Muslim Mainstream have become gathering points for supporters of Erdogan in Germany. But they are also being used to incite hatred against the Turkish president's critics.

More:Pro Erdogan Sites Take Aim at Critics in Germany - SPIEGEL ONLINE

Turkey's Erdogan Isn't as Strong as He Looks; That's What Makes Him Dangerous

Turkey’s Erdogan Isn’t as Strong as He Looks; That’s What Makes Him Dangerous
By Conn Hallinan on 07/04/2017

At first glance, Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s drive to create an executive presidency with almost unlimited power through a nationwide referendum looks like a slam-dunk.

More:Turkey's Erdogan Isn't as Strong as He Looks; That's What Makes Him Dangerous

Despite tough talk, Turkey caught between U.S. and Russia in Syria - One America News Network

Despite tough talk, Turkey caught between U.S. and Russia in Syria

April 7, 2017

By Nick Tattersall, Humeyra Pamuk and Orhan Coskun

ISTANBUL (Reuters) – Turkish calls for tough action against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad after U.S. missile strikes on one of his airbases may overestimate Washington’s appetite for deeper involvement in Syria’s war and threaten Ankara’s fragile rapprochement with Russia.

More:Despite tough talk, Turkey caught between U.S. and Russia in Syria - One America News Network

Brain drain trend ′very dangerous for Turkey′ | Germany | DW.COM | 06.04.2017

Brain drain trend 'very dangerous for Turkey'

Tens of thousands of skilled Turkish-Germans have been going to Turkey for years in hope of a better life. Turkey expert Faruk Sen has told DW he sees that coming to an end.

More:Brain drain trend ′very dangerous for Turkey′ | Germany | DW.COM | 06.04.2017

Thursday, April 06, 2017

Turkey's Erdogan Would Support U.S. Military Action in Syria: Hurriyet | World News | US News

Turkey's Erdogan Would Support U.S. Military Action in Syria: Hurriyet

April 6, 2017, at 4:09 p.m.

ISTANBUL (Reuters) - Turkey would welcome U.S. military action in Syria following a chemical attack that killed scores in Idlib province, and would be ready to assist if needed, President Tayyip Erdogan was quoted as saying on Thursday.

More:Turkey's Erdogan Would Support U.S. Military Action in Syria: Hurriyet | World News | US News

What Tillerson’s meeting in Turkey reveals about Trump’s America First | TheHill

What Tillerson’s meeting in Turkey reveals about Trump’s America First
By Edward G. Stafford, opinion contributor - 04/06/17 03:36 PM EDT

Much has been made in the press about U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley’s refuting the rhetoric of the previous administration that “Assad must go” in Syria. Given less attention, but arguably of more importance given Turkey’s location, its NATO membership, and its facilities useful in the counterterrorism fight, were statements consistent with Haley’s made by Secretary of State Rex Tillerson in Ankara on March 30.

More:What Tillerson’s meeting in Turkey reveals about Trump’s America First | TheHill

Up to 100 Dutch citizens 'prevented from leaving Turkey after criticising President Erdogan' | The Independent

Up to 100 Dutch citizens 'prevented from leaving Turkey after criticising President Erdogan'

Move comes after dispute between nations over cancelled rallies ahead of referendum

More:Up to 100 Dutch citizens 'prevented from leaving Turkey after criticising President Erdogan' | The Independent

Reza Zarrab Lawyers Ordered to Disclose Source of Legal Fees  | Big Law Business

Reza Zarrab Lawyers Ordered to Disclose Source of Legal Fees

By Chris Dolmetsch and Bob Van Voris, Bloomberg News

A federal judge wants to know who’s paying the bills for Rudy Giuliani and other lawyers to represent a Turkish businessman accused of violating sanctions against Iran.

More:Reza Zarrab Lawyers Ordered to Disclose Source of Legal Fees  | Big Law Business

'No, na, hayir!' Turks in Britain vote in presidential referendum | Middle East Eye

'No, na, hayir!' Turks in Britain vote in presidential referendum
#TurkeyChooses

The Turkish diaspora in the UK are overwhelmingly set to oppose changes to Turkish constitution

More:'No, na, hayir!' Turks in Britain vote in presidential referendum | Middle East Eye

Understanding Trexit: What Brexit means for Turkey? – EURACTIV.com

Understanding Trexit: What Brexit means for Turkey?

By Onur Bulbul

Brexit will throw up many challenges for the UK’s trade with Turkey. A long period without a trade deal would be harmful to all sides, writes Onur Bulbul.

More:Understanding Trexit: What Brexit means for Turkey? – EURACTIV.com

A breach between Turkey and the EU that suits both sides

A breach between Turkey and the EU that suits both sides

The two sides accept a rupture is coming and are focused on what should replace it

More:A breach between Turkey and the EU that suits both sides

Wednesday, April 05, 2017

‘If there is one man in power, he can cut through the mess’: a Turkey divided ahead of key poll | The National

‘If there is one man in power, he can cut through the mess’: a Turkey divided ahead of key poll

Stephen Starr

April 5, 2017 Updated: April 5, 2017 01:30 PM

Kadiköy is one of the only districts in Turkey’s largest city to have been transformed for the better, while the rest of the country wallows in a terrorism-induced economic slump. Dozens of cafes, restaurants and bars selling everything from bowls of cereal to tattoos with coffee have opened. On weekends, the area’s seaside parks and alleyways have become a haven away from the drone of politics, a place where the city’s youth can just "be", something that is increasingly precious for those who oppose Turkey’s authoritarian turn.

More:‘If there is one man in power, he can cut through the mess’: a Turkey divided ahead of key poll | The National

Turkey′s referendum runs deeper than ′Yes′ or ′No′ | TOP STORIES | DW.COM | 05.04.2017

Turkey's referendum runs deeper than 'Yes' or 'No'

Less than two weeks remain before Turkey’s referendum on a presidential system and street campaigners are baring the brunt of grievances ahead of the polarizing decision. Diego Cupolo reports from Ankara.

More:Turkey′s referendum runs deeper than ′Yes′ or ′No′ | TOP STORIES | DW.COM | 05.04.2017

'Do you like Erdogan, yes or no?' - La Croix International

'Do you like Erdogan, yes or no?'

Amidst a strained climate, 1.4 million Turks living in Germany have been voting over the past week in their native country's constitutional referendum. The support many of them have given to the Ankara government has caused controversy.

More:'Do you like Erdogan, yes or no?' - La Croix International

Tuesday, April 04, 2017

Reconsidering Turkish military culture and secularism after the coup attempt | openDemocracy

Reconsidering Turkish military culture and secularism after the coup attempt
Hakki Goker Onen 4 April 2017

How did Turkish military culture transform under the rule of AKP? And what will be the impact of the failed coup atempt on the results of the upcoming referendum in Turkey?

More:Reconsidering Turkish military culture and secularism after the coup attempt | openDemocracy

Erdoğan referendum threatens democracy in Turkey | America Magazine

Erdoğan referendum threatens democracy in Turkey
Ryan Richardson April 04, 2017

Turkey is preparing to hold a national referendum that would significantly alter its constitution and form of government. The controversial vote comes as Turkey is beset by political instability and at diplomatic odds with the United States and European nations because of recent reversals of what had been an improving human rights record.

More:Erdoğan referendum threatens democracy in Turkey | America Magazine

Can Turkey afford new battlefront in Iraq?

Can Turkey afford new battlefront in Iraq?

Even as he was closing the door on Operation Euphrates Shield in Syria, Turkey's president threw open a window to potential new cross-border operations against anyone he considers terrorists, including — or perhaps especially — the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK).

More:Can Turkey afford new battlefront in Iraq?

Analysis: What's next for Turkey in Syria? | Turkey | Al Jazeera

Analysis: What's next for Turkey in Syria?

The Euphrates Shield 'reached its natural limits', but Turkey is not ready to leave Syria, according to analysts.

More:Analysis: What's next for Turkey in Syria? | Turkey | Al Jazeera

ANALYSIS: Which map will appear on April 16? - POLITICS

ANALYSIS: Which map will appear on April 16?

ERTUĞRUL ÖZKÖK

Here are four maps of Turkey that I will present for your perusal. These maps are colored according to the “no” and “yes” vote results of the constitutional referendums held in Turkey up until now.

More:ANALYSIS: Which map will appear on April 16? - POLITICS

Turkey-EU suspend political talks until June - DIPLOMACY

Turkey-EU suspend political talks until June

Sevil Erkuş - ANKARA

Turkey and the European Union are not planning to hold any meetings at a political level until the start of summer, diplomatic sources have told the Hürriyet Daily News.

More:Turkey-EU suspend political talks until June - DIPLOMACY

Tough Love for Turkey - Washington Times

Tough Love for Turkey

By Robert McFarlane - Tuesday, April 4, 2017

The republic of Turkey, a beautiful country, has been an ally of the West, but that alliance is in trouble. The Eastern Flank of the North Atlantic Treaty Alliance may be at risk.

Turkey served as the southern anchor of NATO during the Cold War. It is easy to see why: It is the land bridge from Asia to Europe and from the Mideast to Central Asia.

More:Tough Love for Turkey - Washington Times

Turkey Targets Social Media Before Tight Referendum

Turkey Targets Social Media Before Tight Referendum
April 04, 2017 7:20 PM

Dorian Jones

ISTANBUL —

The referendum in Turkey to extend President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's powers is a couple of weeks away, and polls indicate the outcome remains too close to call. The "No" campaign, having little access to mainstream media, is increasingly turning to social media, and human rights groups accuse prosecutors of targeting those who adopt such a strategy.

More:Turkey Targets Social Media Before Tight Referendum

Syria attack could endanger peace talks: Recep Tayyip Erdogan to Vladimir Putin  | The Indian Express

Syria attack could endanger peace talks: Recep Tayyip Erdogan to Vladimir Putin

Turkey has been a major foe of President Bashar al-Assad's regime in Syria throughout the Syrian civil war, repeatedly accusing Damascus of war crimes.

More:Syria attack could endanger peace talks: Recep Tayyip Erdogan to Vladimir Putin  | The Indian Express

Monday, April 03, 2017

Was the Booking.com ban necessary? - GİLA BENMAYOR

Was the Booking.com ban necessary?

Our tourism sector, which is struggling amid a severe crisis, is now experiencing total chaos because of the ban on the hotel reservation website booking.com that came as the result of a case opened by the Association of Turkish Travel Agencies (TURSAB).

More:Was the Booking.com ban necessary? - GİLA BENMAYOR

Turkey has abandoned diplomacy - SEMİH İDİZ

Turkey has abandoned diplomacy

Angry statements from Ankara being flung in all directions, but mostly at the West, show that Turkey has abandoned diplomacy in international affairs. The joint press conference last week in Ankara by Foreign Minister Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu and his U.S. counterpart, Rex Tillerson, showed this once again.

More:Turkey has abandoned diplomacy - SEMİH İDİZ

Despite the Europe drama, Turkey's 'Yes' campaign is in trouble | Middle East Eye

Despite the Europe drama, Turkey's 'Yes' campaign is in trouble
#TurkeyChooses

It has a smaller war chest and less media coverage, but the 'No' campaign has the advantage two weeks away from Turkey's referendum

If it goes ahead, the Turkish referendum, scheduled for 16 April, could usher in the biggest constitutional change in the republic’s history.

Of this fact, there is no denial and both sides in the debate have already adopted in their vocabulary the notion that the switch from a parliamentary system to an executive presidency would be “the most extensive” change in Turkey’s history.

More:Despite the Europe drama, Turkey's 'Yes' campaign is in trouble | Middle East Eye